Carin Ism

I work on governance innovation, on updating the tools available to distribute power and make/enforce decisions. I am the co-founder of How To Rule a World, a production company working to spread knowledge on power and governance models. I give talks on power and governance-related issues and offer advisory services to governments and IGOs. I am also faculty in the future of governance at the Nordic branch of Singularity U. Before this I was Director of Research at Bitnation where i delved deep into the civic tech space. Previous to this I was Executive Director of the Global Challenges Foundation.

If you do anything in the space of reimagining governance and power, do reach out. I am always interested in learning about new projects and perspectives.

Beyond this I am the chair of Effective Altruism Sweden and run a live-in hackerspace in Stockholm, devoted to grow the effective altruism community in the Nordics.

Lastly, when time allows, I make visual art where I explore de- and reconstruction in a most literal sense. You can take a look at it here.

Hot-hand fallacy

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Hot-hand fallacy

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"The fallacious belief a person who experiences success with a random event has a greater probability of further success in additional attempts. The concept is often applied to sports, such as basketball. While previous success at a skill-based athletic task, such as making a shot in basketball, can change the psychological behavior and subsequent success rate of a player, researchers for many years did not find evidence for a "hot hand" in practice. However, later research questioned whether the belief is indeed a fallacy.[1][2] Recent studies using modern statistical analysis show there is evidence for the "hot hand" in some sporting activities."